New Essay (Social Evolution: The Origins of Ethics)

While I am not making this a New Years resolution, I am planning to post more frequently this year than I did over the last couple of months. Today, I am continuing my exploration of ethics by posting an essay concerning social evolution. This is part of an ongoing series that explores ethics from an atheistic perspective. In this essay I develop some thought experiments concerning killing others and explore the implications of various possible rules for when one should kill as a case study in how ethics develop at a societal level.

Moreso than many of my other essays, I expect that readers of mine who are atheists will likely find no new ideas here. I plead patience from such readers, because the clear bafflement of theists who try to understand how an atheist could have ethics at all demands that these obvious-to-us ideas be explicitly stated.

As always, I welcome all comments, suggestions, questions, and challenges about these ideas. Thank you for reading!

New Essay (Origins of the Ethical Imperative)

It has been a long time since my last essay. Real life end-of-year obligations are part of the explanation. Another part is that my planned next topic was a comprehensive essay on the development of a workable atheistic ethical system, and that was turning into a behemoth of an essay. I was struggling constantly with balancing comprehensiveness against tl;dr. Frankly, writing it for public consumption was intimidating me.

So, I’ve decided to break it down into multiple posts, each tackling a portion of the argument. This is therefore going to be a series of posts that together make a larger argument, the first of which I posted back in October (dealing with morality vs. ethics and the failure of divine absolute morality). Today I have posted the second essay in the series, dealing with the origins of an atheistic imperative for behaving ethically. Once complete, this series of posts will constitute not only a description of how atheists (at least some of us) view ethics, but also a rebuttal to the moral arguments for the existence of God.

As always, I am posting these essays in an effort to spawn dialog. In order for me to improve, or ultimately reject, my positions, I need to have them challenged. I therefore welcome any comments, questions, and critiques.